Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphonic Disorder

Many women face emotional and physical issues surrounding their menstrual cycle each month. The two that we are concerned with here are Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) and Premenstrual Dysphonic Disorder (PMDD). The concern is how to diagnose these issues appropriately and to be able to create a method of treatment that will allow women to be able to participate in society, work and family life in a better fashion. There are a lot of stereotypes surrounding these issues and they need to be put aside in order to create a real plan for assisting women in dealing with hormonal and behavioral problems related to experiencing their menstrual cycle.

Why PMS is a Problem

All healthy women go through some form of premenstrual symptoms at some moment in their lives. Many women are going to have similar experiences each month. However the hormonal balance that the menstrual cycle brings upon a woman at times can make them feel unbalanced, emotional and physically affected as well. Women can experience being affected by headaches, cramping and even acne. However if these symptoms are at such a level that they manage to interrupt the ability of a person to be able to function at their job or in society then the diagnosis could be the more serious Premenstrual Syndrome. This means that the inability to function needs to be addressed either with treatment or therapy of some kind.

The most severe of these cases is what is called Premenstrual Dysphonic Disorder. This will affect anywhere from 3-8 percent of all women and is characterized by significant fatigue, severe mood changes and a significant bloating of the abdominal region. Since many of the symptoms are common with the experience of all women then it is the severity that needs to be measured in order to determine the diagnosis of PMDD. Common treatments for alleviating the symptoms of these two problems are a drug treatment that will stop the ovulation process and the resulting hormonal release into the physical system. Since the physical and psychological actions are so severe they often deter women from participating in their careers and lives in an effective manner.

Conclusion

The severe ailments of PMS and PMDD affect a small percentage of women during their typical menstrual cycle. The symptoms are so severe in PMDD that they restrict a persons ability to function in society and in common social situations. The symptoms can be addressed by using a medication, but that can cause some problems of its own.